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Error'd: Days of Future Passed

The Daily WTF - 6 hours 44 min ago

After reading through so many of your submissions these last few weeks, I'm beginning to notice certain patterns emerging. One of these patterns is that despite the fact that dates are literally as old as time, people seem pathologically prone to bungling them. Surely our readers are already familiar with the notable "Falsehoods Programmers Believe" series of blog posts, but if you happen somehow to have been living under an Internet rock (or a cabbage leaf) for the last few decades, you might start your time travails at Infinite Undo. The examples here are not the most egregious ever (there are better coming later or sooner) but they are today's:

Famished Dug S. peckishly pronounces "It's about time!"

 

Far luckier Zachary Palmer appears to have found the perfect solution to poor Dug's delayed dinner: "It took the shipping company a little bit to start moving my package, but they made up for it by shipping it faster than the speed of light," says he.

 

Patient Philip awaits his {ship,prince,processor}: " B&H hitting us with hard truth on when the new line of AMD CPUs will really be available."

 

While an apparent contemporary of the latest royal Eric R. creakily complains " This website for tracking my continuing education hours should be smart enough not to let me enter a date in the year 21 AD"

 

But as for His Lateness Himself, royal servant Steve A. has uncovered a scoop fit for Q:

 

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Categories: Technology

Essex woman threw knife at shopkeeper's chest in attempted robbery

This Is Total Essex - 6 hours 57 min ago
She was armed with two knives in the robbery
Categories: Essex News

We're on our way already: Astroboffins find 5 potentially habitable Tatooine-like planets from Kepler 'scope scans

The Register - 7 hours 10 min ago
Perhaps gigantic puffy exoplanets aren't as hostile to life as previously thought

Astronomers believe five binary-star systems identified by NASA’s now-defunct Kepler Space Telescope could have the right properties to support extraterrestrial life, according to new calculations.…

Categories: Technology

Shift workers are more likely to get heart issues, study warns

Mail Online - 7 hours 13 min ago
Scientists compared the cardiovascular disease risk of individuals and compared it to their natural body clock. For every hour they are out of sync, cardiovascular risk increases by 31%.
Categories: UK News

Coggeshall Literatti aim to clean up "every bit of rubbish" in the town

Braintree and Witham Times - 7 hours 14 min ago
A PASSIONATE group of residents are aiming to clean up every bit of rubbish accumulated in recent years.
Categories: Essex News

FedEx shooting: 'Multiple victims' after shots fired at facility near Indianapolis airport 

Mail Online - 7 hours 16 min ago
Police are investigating a shooting at FedEx facility near Indianapolis airport, according to reports Thursday.
Categories: UK News

All the rules in place for Prince Philip's funeral tomorrow

This Is Total Essex - 7 hours 20 min ago
Strict protocols have been put in place for the funeral
Categories: Essex News

Video shows moment Army Drill Sergeant flees home after being charged for shoving a black man

Mail Online - 7 hours 47 min ago
Jonathan Pentland, the Army drill sergeant who aggressively confronted a young black man outside his home in South Carolina on Monday, fled the house in the early hours of Thursday.
Categories: UK News

Clacton attempted murder trial: Dad who hit teen with car gives evidence

Chelmsford Weekly News - 8 hours 14 min ago
A FATHER accidentally struck three teenagers with a car without realising when he attempted to flee the scene of an attack, a court heard.
Categories: Essex News

Braintree restaurant owner concerned people will struggle to break lockdown habits

Braintree and Witham Times - 8 hours 14 min ago
A restaurant owner is concerned as business was nowhere near as busy as he expected when they reopened as part of the second phase of lockdown lifting.
Categories: Essex News

Clacton attempted murder trial: Dad who hit teen with car gives evidence

Braintree and Witham Times - 8 hours 14 min ago
A FATHER accidentally struck three teenagers with a car without realising when he attempted to flee the scene of an attack, a court heard.
Categories: Essex News

Striking Charter Workers Build ISP Where 'Profits Are Returned To Users'

Slashdot - 9 hours 44 min ago
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Charter Communications employees who have been on strike since 2017 are building an Internet service provider in New York City called "People's Choice." "People's Choice Communications is an employee-owned social enterprise launched by members of IBEW Local #3 to bridge the digital divide and help our neighbors get connected to the Internet during the COVID-19 pandemic," the ISP's website says. "We are the workers who built a large part of New York City's Internet infrastructure in the first place. We built out [Charter] Spectrum's cable system, until in 2017, the company pushed us out on strike by taking away our healthcare, retirement, and other benefits. It's now the longest strike in US history." So far, People's Choice says it has completed rooftop antenna installations at two schools in the Bronx and installed "hardline connections to wireless access points connecting 121 units" at housing for survivors of domestic violence who have disabilities. A Gizmodo article said the system is equipped to offer minimum speeds of 25Mbps downstream and 3Mbps upstream, meeting a broadband standard that has been used by the Federal Communications Commission since 2015. "We have a big portion of most of the Bronx covered with our antenna," IBEW Local #3 steward Troy Walcott told Gizmodo. "Now we have to go building by building to let people know we're out there and start turning them on." "A few dozen Spectrum strikers have been actively involved in the installations, but Walcott expects that at least one hundred workers are waiting in the wings for the project to scale up," the Gizmodo article said. "We work in affordable housing, supportive housing, co-op housing, NYCHA [NYC Housing Authority], homeless shelters, and regular old apartment complexes," the webpage notes. You can fill out this form if you're interested in bringing broadband to your building. "After we build out a network in your building, it transfers to cooperative ownership, so profits are returned to users," the People's Choice website says. "We are able to provide high-speed service in most cases for $10-$20/month. No more cable company ripping you off, and as an owner, you have a vote in policies like data privacy."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology

California To Hunt Greenhouse Gas Leaks and Superemitters With Monitoring Satellites

Slashdot - 11 hours 12 min ago
California and its partners are set to launch by 2023 two satellites to spot and monitor plumes of planet-warming carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane. "If all goes right, dozens more could follow," reports Science Magazine. From the report: The $100 million Carbon Mapper project, announced today and financed by private philanthropists including Michael Bloomberg, will advance efforts to track concentrated emissions of greenhouse gases, which rise from fossil fuel power plants, leaky pipelines, and abandoned wells. Previous satellites have lacked the resolution and focus to monitor point sources rigorously. [...] The satellites will be built and managed by Planet, a California company that already operates a constellation of Earth-imaging satellites. The spacecraft will rely on "hyperspectral" imaging spectrometers developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Rather than gathering light in just a few discrete wavelength channels, like the human eye, these spectrometers capture reflected sunlight and subdivide it into more than 400 wavelength channels across the visible and into the infrared. The intensity of light across these channels can be tied to specific chemistries and reflect the abundances of certain gases in the air molecules below. The satellites won't just measure gases in the air; they will also detect chemical signatures on the ground. By measuring the intensity of green chlorophyll or detecting the signatures for excess salts or fungus, for example, researchers will be able to evaluate the health of crops and forests. They can prospect for minerals in remote regions. They can map and identify different coral and algae species, and they can track dust and soot. Even snow and ice pops out in these sensors, says Robert Green, a remote-sensing scientist at JPL. "Snow is one of the most colorful materials on Earth if you look beyond visible light." The first two Carbon Mapper satellites will each be roughly the size of a washing machine, weighing up to 200 kilograms. They will provide imagery with a resolution of 30 meters but won't offer global coverage at first. Instead, they will target regions known to host superemitters, like power plants, oil and gas drilling, or livestock operations. The regions will be revisited every few weeks to start. All emission data, calculated from the plume intensity and length, will be made publicly available -- in the hopes that governments and businesses will do more to staunch leaks and tamp down discharges. [...] Should Carbon Mapper's first two satellites prove successful, Planet envisions building a commercial constellation of similar satellites that would revisit every spot on the planet once a day, and selling those data to regulators and companies.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology

ADRIAN THRILLS: Taylor Swift revamps the album that made her a superstar 

Mail Online - 11 hours 23 min ago
When Taylor Swift released her second album, Fearless, in 2008, she used it to articulate the hopes and fears of her female fans. Now, 13 years on, she's revisiting it with a re-recording.
Categories: UK News

BAZ BAMIGBOYE: Michael B. Jordan's Navy Seal of approval for classic Tom Clancy thriller 

Mail Online - 11 hours 31 min ago
BAZ BAMIGBOYE: Michael B. Jordan is reclining on a sofa. Or perhaps it's a giant beanbag... it's hard to tell.
Categories: UK News

Global chip shortage probably won't let up until 2023, warns TSMC: CEO 'still expects capacity to tighten more'

The Register - 11 hours 44 min ago
Automotive supply is a 'top priority', analysts told

TSMC this week warned the ongoing global shortage of semiconductor supplies will probably continue throughout this year and next.…

Categories: Technology

Manchester City star Phil Foden, 20, announces second baby is on the way

Mail Online - 11 hours 45 min ago
England star Phil Foden and his childhood sweetheart Rebecca Cooke had their first child Ronnie in January 2019, while Foden was 18 years old.
Categories: UK News

As few as 2 per cent of positive Covid lateral flow test results are accurate, adviser warns

Mail Online - 11 hours 45 min ago
In emails, leaked to the Guardian, senior strategist Ben Dyson is said to have warned health department colleagues about the unreliability of lateral flow test results.
Categories: UK News

Google Researchers Boost Speech Recognition Accuracy With More Datasets

Slashdot - 11 hours 49 min ago
What if the key to improving speech recognition accuracy is simply mixing all available speech datasets together to train one large AI model? That's the hypothesis behind a recent study published by a team of researchers affiliated with Google Research and Google Brain. They claim an AI model named SpeechStew that was trained on a range of speech corpora achieves state-of-the-art or near-state-of-the-art results on a variety of speech recognition benchmarks. VentureBeat reports: In pursuit of a solution, the Google researchers combined all available labeled and unlabelled speech recognition data curated by the community over the years. They drew on AMI, a dataset containing about 100 hours of meeting recordings, as well as corpora that include Switchboard (approximately 2,000 hours of telephone calls), Broadcast News (50 hours of television news), Librispeech (960 hours of audiobooks), and Mozilla's crowdsourced Common Voice. Their combined dataset had over 5,000 hours of speech -- none of which was adjusted from its original form. With the assembled dataset, the researchers used Google Cloud TPUs to train SpeechStew, yielding a model with more than 100 million parameters. In machine learning, parameters are the properties of the data that the model learned during the training process. The researchers also trained a 1-billion-parameter model, but it suffered from degraded performance. Once the team had a general-purpose SpeechStew model, they tested it on a number of benchmarks and found that it not only outperformed previously developed models but demonstrated an ability to adapt to challenging new tasks. Leveraging Chime-6, a 40-hour dataset of distant conversations in homes recorded by microphones, the researchers fine-tuned SpeechStew to achieve accuracy in line with a much more sophisticated model. Transfer learning entails transferring knowledge from one domain to a different domain with less data, and it has shown promise in many subfields of AI. By taking a model like SpeechStew that's designed to understand generic speech and refining it at the margins, it's possible for AI to, for example, understand speech in different accents and environments.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology

BBC presenter Samira Ahmed says she is 'haunted' by fear coverage boosted Nigel Farage and Ukip 

Mail Online - 11 hours 49 min ago
Samira Ahmed said that she remembered complaints about the BBC's coverage 'building up' Nigel Farage and his Ukip party in the early 2010s.
Categories: UK News

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