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Fancy a steaming portion of Kentucky Fried Bork? A fingerlickin' flub that's pure poultry in motion

The Register - Fri, 2020-10-23 09:30
Greasy goodness plays havoc with a PC's disk

Bork!Bork!Bork!  The best borks are the simplest, and today's is no exception. A black screen, a plaintive message, and a nugget of the Colonel's menu for the hungry masses has been lost.…

Categories: Technology

IBM builds AI that correctly predicts onset of Alzheimer’s 71% of the time, better than standard clinical tests

The Register - Fri, 2020-10-23 08:54
IBM builds AI that correctly predicts onset of Alzheimer’s 71% of the time, better than standard clinical tests

Machine-learning algorithms analyzing human communication can predict whether someone will develop Alzheimer’s disease more accurately than standard biomedical screening, say IBM and Pfizer.…

Categories: Technology

The engineer lurking behind the curtain: Musical monitors on a meagre IT budget

The Register - Fri, 2020-10-23 08:15
The 'S' in SX, stands for 'Sporty', ok?

On Call  One of the hardest tasks in IT is giving a user what they need, while also persuading them it's what they want. Join us for another tale from our weekly On Call column where a Register reader achieved the seemingly impossible.…

Categories: Technology

Why Intel's Stock Just Dropped 10% After Reporting Earnings

Slashdot - Fri, 2020-10-23 08:00
Intel shares are off around 10% in after-hours trading after the chip company reported its Q3 data. TechCrunch explains why: Investors had expected Intel to report an adjusted $1.11 in per-share profit, off around 22% from the year-ago period. They also expected it to report revenues of $18.26 billion in Q3, down a more modest 5% compared to the year-ago Q3. Notably, Intel beat revenue expectations with top line of $18.3 billion, and met earnings-per-share estimates of $1.11, on an adjusted basis. So, why are Intel shares sharply lower? Quick consensus appears to point to weakness in the company data-focused business unit, the smaller of Intel's two halves (the other focuses on PC chips). Inside the data-side of Intel, its Data Center Group (DCG) had mixed results, including cloud revenue growth of 15%. However, at the same time, the DCG's "Enterprise & Government" business shrank 47% compared to the year-ago period, following what Intel described as "two quarters of more than 30 percent growth." Off that weakness, the resulting top line miss was sharp, with the market expecting $6.22 billion in revenue and DCG only delivering $5.9 billion. Intel blamed COVID-19 for the weak economics conditions at play in the result. The company also highlighted COVID-19 when it discussed results from its internet of things business and memory operation, which declined 33% and 11% on a year-over-year basis, respectively. Perhaps due to COVID-19's recent resurgence in both North America and Europe, investors are concerned that the macroeconomic issues harming Intel's growth could continue. If so, growth could be negative for a longer period than anticipated. That perspective could have led to some selling of Intel's equity after the earnings report.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Ed Snowden doesn’t need to worry about being turfed out of Russia any more

The Register - Fri, 2020-10-23 07:34
Immigration reforms allowing more skilled workers to stay seem to have resulted in permanent residency

Russia has apparently given super-leaker Edward Snowden de facto permanent residence.…

Categories: Technology

Error'd: Errors by the Pound

The Daily WTF - Fri, 2020-10-23 07:30

"I can understand selling swiss cheese by the slice, but copier paper by the pound?" Dave P. wrote.

 

Amanda R. writes, "Ok, that's fine, but can the 1% correctly spell 'people'?"

 

"In this form, language is quite variable as is when you are able to cancel your reservation ...which are in fact, actual variables," wrote Jean-Pierre M.

 

Barry M. wrote, "Hey, Royal Caribbean, you know what? I'll take the win-win: total control AND save $7!"

 

"Oh wow! The secret on how to write good articles is out!" writes Barry L.

 

[Advertisement] ProGet’s got you covered with security and access controls on your NuGet feeds. Learn more.
Categories: Technology

What makes data scientists look so cool? The data engineers doing the real work

The Register - Fri, 2020-10-23 07:00
With DSTI’s data engineering MSc, you can study in Paris, Nice, Lagos… or home

Promo  Data scientists like to think of themselves as doing the sexiest job of the 21st century, but it’s only because data engineers let them think that way.…

Categories: Technology

After Dutch bloke claims he hacked Trump's Twitter by guessing password, web biz says there's 'no evidence'

The Register - Fri, 2020-10-23 06:36
It's saying something when it's easy to believe the US President's passphrase was maga2020!

Donald Trump's Twitter password was easily guessed, and he still isn't using multi-factor authentication, claims a Dutch hacker who on Thursday bragged he broke into the President's account last week. Twitter says it has "no evidence" this claim is true.…

Categories: Technology

Facebook is leaky, creepy, and trashy. Now it wants to host some of your customer data

The Register - Fri, 2020-10-23 06:15
Reveals hosting service for WhatsApp Business API and gives its partners reasons to be fearful

Facebook wants to host some of your customer data, an offer that hurts its own partner community.…

Categories: Technology

China reveals audit of 320,000 local apps, with 34 booted from app stores and hundreds of devs warned they could suffer same fate

The Register - Fri, 2020-10-23 05:27
Privacy crackdown in the land of ubiquitous surveillance, where 5G now blankets all cities

Through most of 2020 bans on Chinese apps have meant geopolitical strife, but China yesterday revealed it has started banning some of its own apps.…

Categories: Technology

It's Official: Solar Is the Cheapest Electricity In History

Slashdot - Fri, 2020-10-23 04:30
An anonymous reader writes: In a new report, the International Energy Agency (IEA) says solar is now the cheapest form of electricity for utility companies to build. That's thanks to risk-reducing financial policies around the world, the agency says, and it applies to locations with both the most favorable policies and the easiest access to financing. The report underlines how important these policies are to encouraging development of renewables and other environmentally forward technologies. Carbon Brief (CB) summarizes the annual report with a lot of key details. The World Energy Outlook 2020 "offers four 'pathways' to 2040, all of which see a major rise in renewables," CB says. "The IEA's main scenario has 43 [percent] more solar output by 2040 than it expected in 2018, partly due to detailed new analysis showing that solar power is 20 [to] 50 [percent] cheaper than thought." The calculation depends on financing figures compared with the amount of output for solar projects. That means that at the same time panel technology gets more efficient and prices for basic panels continue to fall, investors are getting better and better financing deals. "Previously the IEA assumed a range of 7 [to] 8 [percent] for all technologies, varying according to each country's stage of development," explains CB. "Now, the IEA has reviewed the evidence internationally and finds that for solar, the cost of capital is much lower, at 2.6 [to] 5.0 [percent] in Europe and the US, 4.4 [to] 5.5 [percent] in China and 8.8 [to] 10.0 [percent] in India."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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After first floating $20 billion penalty, DoJ suggests $60m fine for UMC's theft of Micron’s DRAM secrets

The Register - Fri, 2020-10-23 03:58
Taiwanese chipmaker promises ‘substantial assistance’ in ongoing China IP theft action

Taiwanese chip-maker United Microelectronics Corporation (UMC) will plead guilty to theft of trade secrets from Micron Technologies and pay a $60m fine to the USA.…

Categories: Technology

Software Engineer Reverse-Engineers McDonald's Ordering API To Find Locations With a Broken Ice Cream Machine

Slashdot - Fri, 2020-10-23 03:02
Software engineer Rashiq Zahid debuted a web app today that uses a reverse-engineered version of McDonald's ordering API to query every single McDonald's in the United States. "Assuming a store has correctly indicated that ice cream is unavailable and that its ice cream machine isn't working, it'll show up as a little red dot on the McBroken map," reports Lifehacker. From the report: Zahid even built in a statistics box into McBroken so you can see how various cities compare for ice cream uptime. According to Zahid, his system works by queueing up nearly $20,000 worth of orders each minute. Don't worry; he's not placing them and cancelling them over and over, so no McDonald's worker has yet to dunk their head in the fryer as a result of Zahid's shenanigans. A number of different users on Twitter and Product Hunt have tested out Zahid's app by heading over to their local McDonald's restaurants and seeing what they can order. For the most part, the app checks out. Of course, there will still be occasional instances where a "working" ice cream machine actually isn't. Or, if you're lucky, you might find that an offline ice cream machine has since been reincarnated and that McDonald's simply forgot to note the change on their end. As for how long this little tool will exist before McDonald's gets wind of it and breaks its functionality, well, I'd place my ice cream order sooner than later.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Down the Swanny: '2020 has been the most challenging year in my career' says Intel CEO as profit plunges 30%

The Register - Fri, 2020-10-23 02:35
Enterprise and govt data-center sales halve, Xeon processors delayed

Intel shares dived today after it revealed a steep slump in enterprise and government sales of its server chips – and delays to its latest Xeons.…

Categories: Technology

Minecraft Will Require a Microsoft Account To Play In 2021

Slashdot - Fri, 2020-10-23 02:25
Minecraft said in a blog post yesterday that players will need a Microsoft account to play the game in 2021. Those who do not switch will be unable to play. The Verge reports: The game has existed in two separately developed versions since its 2011 launch on consoles. Previously, the original Minecraft: Java Edition used Mojang accounts, while Minecraft: Bedrock Edition, the name for the console and Windows store version of the game, used Microsoft accounts. After this change, the accounts will be the same, but there's still no crossplay: you still won't be able to play with friends using the other version of the game. Mojang says players migrating from Mojang accounts will not lose any information and that the new accounts will offer two-factor authentication (2FA) and other safety features previously available in the Bedrock Edition of the game, like parental controls and the ability to block chats and invitations -- a concern for younger players on multiplayer servers. Players will be emailed in batches in the coming months on how to migrate and will receive an additional notification on their profile page when they're able to create a new account. Alongside the blog post, Mojang created a video to explain the switch and preempt player complaints. The Verge points out that usernames for Java Edition players are at risk, which could make many players angry. "In support articles addressing the change, Mojang is clear that your username won't be affected in-game, but if someone is already using your name or it doesn't meet Microsoft's standards, you might be forced to log in with a different one," reports The Verge. "There may not be as many names available to pick from, given that console players have had eight years to snap them up."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Drivers Sue Uber Over Pressure To Support Prop 22

Slashdot - Fri, 2020-10-23 01:45
Uber drivers say the company unlawfully pressured them to support a ballot initiative that would make gig workers independent contractors, according to a lawsuit filed Thursday in San Francisco Superior Court by a proposed class of California drivers. Bloomberg Law reports: The suit alleges Uber used a coercive campaign of misinformation to exert pressure on drivers to advocate and vote for the passage of Proposition 22, which would overturn a California law that makes it difficult for the gig companies to be classified as contractors. If the workers were classified as employees, they would be entitled to overtime, minimum wage and other benefits. According to the complaint Uber, Lyft and other gig economy giants invested nearly $200 million into the campaign "Yes on 22." The drivers in the lawsuit say they were faced with a "barrage of misinformation" about the ballot initiative through pop-ups on the Uber app, which made misleading representations about driver benefits under Proposition 22 including regarding accident insurance, earnings guarantees, scheduling, and anti-discrimination protections. One such pop-up only provides the opportunity for drivers to select "Yes on Prop. 22" or "OK," to exit, which pressures drivers to accept Uber's political stance, the complaint alleges. The proposed class action claims the company is attempting to direct the political activities of its California drivers with respect to Proposition 22, and threatening their discharge to coerce them to follow a particular political course of action, in direct violation of state law.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Print These Electronic Circuits Directly Onto Skin

Slashdot - Fri, 2020-10-23 01:02
An anonymous reader quotes a report from IEEE Spectrum: New circuits can get printed directly on human skin to help monitor vital signs, a new study finds. In the new study, researchers developed a way to sinter nanoparticles of silver at room temperature. The key behind this advance is a so-called a sintering aid layer, consisting of a biodegradable polymer paste and additives such as titanium dioxide or calcium carbonate. Positive electrical charges in the sintering aid layer neutralized the negative electrical charges the silver nanoparticles could accumulate from other compounds in their ink. This meant it took less energy for the silver nanoparticles printed on top of the sintering aid layer to come together, says study senior author Huanyu Cheng, a mechanical engineer at Pennsylvania State University. The sintering aid layer also created a smooth base for circuits printed on top of it. This in turn improved the performance of these circuits in the face of bending, folding, twisting and wrinkling. In experiments, the scientists placed the silver nanoparticle circuit designs and the sintering aid layer onto a wooden stamp, which they pressed onto the back of a human hand. They next used a hair dryer set to cool to evaporate the solvent in the ink. A hot shower could easily remove these circuits without damaging the underlying skin. After the circuits sintered, they could help the researchers measure body temperature, skin moisture, blood oxygen, heart rate, respiration rate, blood pressure and bodily electrical signals such as electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) readings. The data from these sensors were comparable to or better than those measured using conventional commercial sensors that were simply stuck onto the skin, Cheng says. The findings have been published in the journal Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Is it Iran or Russia's hackers we need to worry about? The Russians, definitely the Russians, says US intelligence

The Register - Fri, 2020-10-23 00:39
Energetic Bear team caught breaking into govt systems, no harm done to Nov 3 elections

The FBI and the US government's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency on Thursday issued a joint warning that a Kremlin hacking crew is probing or breaking into systems belonging to the US government and aviation industry.…

Categories: Technology

Tesla's Full Self-Driving Beta Rolls Out To Rave Reviews

Slashdot - Fri, 2020-10-23 00:25
Rei writes: "Oh, it's going dude!" "But there's no lanes -- there's cars on the side of the road!" "DUDE, it's navigating through it ALL, bro!" ... "It paused to look DUDE!" "There's NO LANES! Elon, you madman!" Such was one of the many reaction videos to come out overnight as Tesla released a major upgrade of Autopilot to a limited public beta. Complete with a new LIDAR-like visualization system, the car now provides a detailed display of how it perceives the world as it dodges parked cars, takes unprotected left turns with cross traffic and pedestrians, etc. No issues have been reported thus far, although one driver aborted after a roundabout due to a panicked passenger who didn't like how it exited into a lane with parked cars ahead (though the screen showed that it planned to change lanes to go around them). The new version is the result of a long-running "4D" rewrite at Tesla, to overcome local maxima in earlier versions. Instead of processing each camera individually as a static series of frames, the neural net now processes a unified stitch of inputs over time, allowing context to persist between cameras and between frames. This in particular enhances parallax processing of depth input, both in terms of parallax between camera viewpoints and parallax between vehicle positions. If the public beta goes well, Elon is hopeful that Tesla will be able to roll out the new version broadly by the end of the year.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology

IT'S INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY

Slashdot - Fri, 2020-10-23 00:05
bobstreo informs us that it's CAPS LOCK DAY and shares an excerpt about its history: Caps Lock Day first came to pass in the year 2000, when Derek Arnold of Iowa decided that he, like so many other internet users, had simply had enough of people using all caps to emphasize themselves on the web. So he created Caps Lock Day in the interest of poking fun at people who use this abomination of a typing style, and to finally bring some sanity to the net. On mechanical typewriters, the Caps Lock key was first the Shift lock key. One of the earlier innovations in the use of typewriters saw a second character being added to each typebar. This caused the number of characters that a person was able to type to be doubled with the same number of keys being used. The second character was located above the first on each typebar's face, and the Shift key would cause the apparatus in its entirety to move, physically shifting the typebars position relative to the ribbon of inx. Just like in contemporary keyboards for computers today, the shifted position was used to create secondary characters and product capitals. The invention of the Shift lock key was for the purpose of maintaining the shift operation indefinitely without continual effort. The typebars were mechanically locked in a shifted position, resulting in the upper character being typed when any key was pressed. This was also supposed to lower finger muscle pain caused by repetitive typing because it could be challenging to hold the shift down for more than two or three consecutive strokes prior to this. On mechanical typewriters, you would typically hit both Lock and Shift at the same time. After this, you press shift by itself in order to release the lock.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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